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The Religions of Ancient Israel A Synthesis of Parallactic Approaches by Ziony Zevit

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Published by Continuum International Publishing Group .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • History of religion,
  • Religion - Commentaries / Reference,
  • Jewish shrines,
  • Ancient Archaeology,
  • Jewish Holocaust,
  • Religion,
  • Ancient World,
  • Israel,
  • Judaism,
  • Antiquities & Archaeology,
  • Christianity - History - General,
  • History,
  • To 70 A.D,
  • Judaism - History,
  • Antiquities,
  • Palestine

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages821
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9681136M
ISBN 100826447287
ISBN 109780826447289

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  About The Religions of Ancient Israel This is the most far-reaching interdisciplinary investigation into the religion of ancient Israel ever attempted. The author draws on textual readings, archaeological and historical data and epigraphy to determine what is known about the Israelite religions during the Iron Age ( BCE).   "Richard Hess's book on Israelite religions displays impressive knowledge of their archaeological and ancient Near Eastern background as well as of the modern scholarly literature (over one thousand items in the bibliography!). Even those who will question some of Hess's more conservative conclusions will learn much from this fascinating volume."--Cited by: The Religions of Ancient Israel: A Synthesis of Parallactic Approaches. Ziony Zevit. A&C Black, Jun 1, - Religion - pages. 1 Review. This is the most far-reaching interdisciplinary 5/5(1).   Kaufman's study is a masterful introduction to the religion of ancient Israel. Because it was published in Hebrew and in multiple volumes no less, Kaufman?s work was generally overlooked when it was published. However, once Moshe Greenberg abridged and translated Kaufman's study into English, more scholars discovered what Kaufman has to say/5(7).

Patrich D. Miller investigates the role religion played in the family, village, tribe, and nation-state of ancient Israel. He situates Israel's religion in context where a variety of social forces affected beliefs, and where popular cults openly competed with the "official" religion/5(23).   This new volume from T&T Clark, edited by Francesca Stavrakopoulou and John Barton, combines essays from a diverse and international field of scholars focused on the diversity of religious belief and practice in ancient Israel and Judah. A number of concerns guide the volume's contributions/5(4).   The Hebrew Bible is a book that was primarily written by men, for men, and about men, and thus the biblical text is not particularly forthcoming when it comes to the lives and experiences of women. Other evidence from ancient Israel—the society in which the Hebrew Bible was generated—is also often of little use. Nevertheless, scholars have been able to Cited by: 1. The Old Testament describes the creation of the world, God’s covenant with the Israelites and the many struggles of the Israelite people. The New Testament is dominated by the teachings of Jesus.

  The history of ancient Israel is best known to most people from the narratives in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. There, however, the name “Israel” covers a wide diversity of social and political entities over the course of many centuries. The first attestation of the name outside the Bible (on the Egyptian stela of Merneptah, c. bce) seems to refer at most to Author: H. G. M. Williamson. THIS BOOK, although written in English and addressed to people living outside the State of Israel, is, in a way, a continuation of my political activities as an Israeli Jew. Those activities began in with a protest which caused a considerable scandal at the time: I had personally witnessed an ultra-religious JewFile Size: KB. This is the most far-reaching interdisciplinary investigation into the religion of ancient Israel ever attempted. The author draws on textual readings, archaeological and historical data and epigraphy to determine what is known about the Israelite religions during the . Israel, founded in the aftermath of the Holocaust, was created in the Jews' ancestral homeland to provide a national home, safe from persecution, for the Jewish people. Although Israeli law explicitly grants equal civil rights to all citizens regardless of religion, ethnicity, or other heritage, it gives preferential treatment in certain aspects to individuals who fall within the criteria.